With one skate in the crease, Dallas Stars right wing Brett Hull (22) shoots the Stanley Cup winning goal past the sprawling Buffalo Sabres goalie Dominik Hasek (39) in the third overtime period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals in Buffalo, NY, on June 20, 1999. // The Crease Rule (AP Photo/Gene Puskar)

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With one skate in the crease, Dallas Stars right wing Brett Hull (22) shoots the Stanley Cup winning goal past the sprawling Buffalo Sabres goalie Dominik Hasek (39) in the third overtime period of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals in Buffalo, NY, on June 20, 1999.

In the late 1990s, NHL goaltenders were getting run left, right, and centre. So the league decided to crack its discipline whip and forbade any player from entering the crease area before the arrival of the puck. While powers that be had good intensions, the rule forced nearly every goal to be analyzed and reviewed at great lengths to see if a forward's baby toe appeared in the blue paint prior to the puck. Worst of all, after going by the book for two seasons, the league let its guard down and allowed Brett Hull's 1999 overtime Stanley Cup-winning goal to count, even though he broke the rule.

* Bing: See Hull's goal