Texas Rangers pitcher Gaylord Perry holds a tube, top photo, while sitting on the bench between innings during an American league game against the Royals Aug.31, 1977. Shielded by towel, Perry's left hand goes to the right side of his neck, bottom left photo. While on the mound, bottom right photo, his pitching hand touches the right side of his neck. Perry was the winning pitcher in an 8-2 win. It is not known what the tube contains, nor what he was doing with the tube and the towel. // 3. Gaylord Perry and the spitter (CP PHOTO/Files-AP)

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Texas Rangers pitcher Gaylord Perry holds a tube, top photo, while sitting on the bench between innings during an American league game against the Royals Aug.31, 1977. Shielded by towel, Perry's left hand goes to the right side of his neck, bottom left photo. While on the mound, bottom right photo, his pitching hand touches the right side of his neck. Perry was the winning pitcher in an 8-2 win. It is not known what the tube contains, nor what he was doing with the tube and the towel.

He won more than 300 games in a career that spanned 22 seasons, but pitcher Gaylord Perry will forever be remembered for "loading up," baseball code for putting an illegal substance on the ball. Whether it was spit, Vaseline, or whatever he could find, Perry made no secret of his subterfuge. In 1974, still in the middle of his playing days, he wrote an autobiography entitled "Me and the Spitter." Perry was finally suspended for doctoring baseballs in 1982.