Winter OlympicsWinter Olympics
Updated: September 24, 2013 11:54 AM |
Winter Olympics: 100 great moments

Katarina Witt (Calgary 1988)



Katarina Witt on her way to winning gold in Sarajevo (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
Next
Previous
Previous
  • Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean performing their gold medal- winning routine (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Matti Nykanen celebrates winning one of his three gold medals in Calgary (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • The Jamaican bobsleigh team during their final run in Calgary (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Katarina Witt on her way to winning gold in Sarajevo (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Brian Boitano won gold in 1988 ahead of Brian Orser (left) and Viktor Petrenko (right) (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Yvonne van Gennip in action in Calgary (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Eddie 'The Eagle' Edwards in Calgary in 1988 (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
  • Lyubov Yegorova and Raisa Smetanina wait to receive their relay gold medals in 1992 (© Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
Next
Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.Show Thumbnails
Previous32 of 101Next
Share this Gallery

The beautiful, elegant East German Katarina Witt became the first woman since Sonja Henie 56 years earlier to retain her Olympic figure skating title in Calgary in 1988.

Witt had captivated the crowds in Sarajevo four years earlier when she won the first of her Olympic titles with a close victory over the fancied American Rosalynn Sumners.

Witt came up against another strong American, Debi Thomas, in Calgary but rose to the occasion by landing four triple jumps to eclipse her rival and retain her title.

After her second victory Witt turned professional and toured the world, but she could not resist one final Olympic appearance and returned in Lillehammer in 1994.

Witt was no longer a realistic gold medal contender but she produced a memorable performance to a version of 'Where Have All The Flowers Gone', which she dedicated to the people of the war-ravaged city in which she had claimed her first Olympic title.